1896 U.S. Historical  Presidential Ballot McKinley vs Bryan
1896 U.S. Historical  Presidential Ballot McKinley vs Bryan
1896 U.S. Historical  Presidential Ballot McKinley vs Bryan
1896 U.S. Historical  Presidential Ballot McKinley vs Bryan
1896 U.S. Historical  Presidential Ballot McKinley vs Bryan
1896 U.S. Historical  Presidential Ballot McKinley vs Bryan
1896 U.S. Historical  Presidential Ballot McKinley vs Bryan

1896 U.S. Historical Presidential Ballot McKinley vs Bryan

Regular price $750.00
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A fascinating piece of U.S. American History. The ballot is unused, other than the name of Ellen Jones being on it. Which is interesting in the fact that women were still not able to vote in 1896 in New York state. Which is where the Town of Hounsfield is located.

Please refer to photos for condition and email if you have any questions. Will be mailed in its folded state. 

Measures when open about 10 11/16"  X 9 3/4"

The 1896 Presidential Election broke the mold of American politics. To face off against a Republican establishment candidate, William McKinley, the Democrats nominated a political outsider, William Jennings Bryan. In doing so they sought to capitalize on the anger of farmers and workers, who blamed their troubles on wealthy businessmen, railroad monopolists, Eastern bankers and distant politicians. Bryan’s fiery speeches, impassioned advocacy of bimetallism and fierce defense of the common people, in addition to appealing to Democrats, appealed to Populists, supporters of the third party of agrarian origin that arose out of dissatisfaction with the two establishment parties.

The 1896 campaign, capped by Bryan’s narrow loss, has long been seen as a turning point. People have characterize it as the first 20th century presidential campaign. McKinley raised unprecedented amounts of campaign funds and mounted a nationwide campaign organization. In contrast, Bryan’s unconventional campaign eschewed the media, which was arrayed against him, in favor of a new approach designed to facilitate direct communication with voters, which notably featured the first nationwide whistle-stop campaign. It was the election that started the rural-urban voter divide.